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Does School Choice Work?

Does School Choice Work?

Sessional Papers

Sessional Papers

School Social Work: Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

School Social Work: Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

This ebook is a selective guide designed to help scholars and students of social work find reliable sources of information by directing them to the best available scholarly materials in whatever form or format they appear from books, chapters, and journal articles to online archives, electronic data sets, and blogs. Written by a leading international authority on the subject, the ebook provides bibliographic information supported by direct recommendations about which sources to consult and editorial commentary to make it clear how the cited sources are interrelated related. A reader will discover, for instance, the most reliable introductions and overviews to the topic, and the most important publications on various areas of scholarly interest within this topic. In social work, as in other disciplines, researchers at all levels are drowning in potentially useful scholarly information, and this guide has been created as a tool for cutting through that material to find the exact source you need. This ebook is a static version of an article from Oxford Bibliographies Online: Social Work, a dynamic, continuously updated, online resource designed to provide authoritative guidance through scholarship and other materials relevant to the study and practice of social work. Oxford Bibliographies Online covers most subject disciplines within the social science and humanities, for more information visit www.aboutobo.com.

Knowing Work

Knowing Work

This book discusses new contradictions in the processes of vocational education. It poses questions on how today's knowledge is to be taught and what should be learned within vocational education. The meanings of work, the characteristics of knowledge and knowing, and the processes of vocational learning and educating are complex in contemporary societies. The vocabularies, discourses, and policies are changing globally. Coexisting and contradictory processes, practices, ideas, and ideals shift, waver, and then take hold. It is difficult to understand how they relate to their societies and to the lives of human beings. The neo-liberal policies governing the relations between capital and labour - the state and the labour market - severely affect both the changing and unchanging features of working and learning. The book approaches vocational education from three perspectives: moral and symbolic orders that are embedded in cultural and social relations, working and knowing at school and at the work place, and the dynamic combination of knowing and working as these are experienced within the ideas and practices of vocational education.

Improving School-to-Work Transitions

Improving School-to-Work Transitions

As anxieties about America’s economic competitiveness mounted in the 1980s, so too did concerns that the nation’s schools were not adequately preparing young people for the modern workplace. Spurred by widespread joblessness and job instability among young adults, the federal government launched ambitious educational reforms in the 1990s to promote career development activities for students. In recent years, however, the federal government has shifted its focus to test-based reforms like No Child Left Behind that emphasize purely academic subjects. At this critical juncture in education reform, Improving School-To-Work Transitions, edited by David Neumark, weighs the successes and failures of the ’90s-era school-to-work initiatives, and assesses how high schools, colleges, and government can help youths make a smoother transition into stable, well-paying employment. Drawing on evidence from national longitudinal studies, surveys, interviews, and case studies, the contributors to Improving School-To-Work Transitions offer thought-provoking perspectives on a variety of aspects of the school-to-work problem. Deborah Reed, Christopher Jepsen, and Laura Hill emphasize the importance of focusing school-to-work programs on the diverse needs of different demographic groups, particularly immigrants, who represent a growing proportion of the youth population. David Neumark and Donna Rothstein investigate the impact of school-to-work programs on the “forgotten half,” students at the greatest risk of not attending college. Using data from the 1997 National Longitudinal Study of Youth, they find that participation by these students in programs like job shadowing, mentoring, and summer internships raise employment and college attendance rates among men and earnings among women. In a study of nine high schools with National Academy Foundation career academies, Terry Orr and her fellow researchers find that career academy participants are more engaged in school and are more likely to attend a four-year college than their peers. Nan Maxwell studies the skills demanded in entry-level jobs and finds that many supposedly “low-skilled” jobs actually demand extensive skills in reading, writing, and math, as well as the “new basic skills” of communication and problem-solving. Maxwell recommends that school districts collaborate with researchers to identify which skills are most in demand in their local labor markets. At a time when test-based educational reforms are making career development programs increasingly vulnerable, it is worth examining the possibilities and challenges of integrating career-related learning into the school environment. Written for educators, policymakers, researchers, and anyone concerned about how schools are shaping the economic opportunities of young people, Improving School-To-Work Transitions provides an authoritative guide to a crucial issue in education reform.

School to Work Transition in Japan

School to Work Transition in Japan

This participant-observation study presents the practice of school to work transition at two Japanese high schools, and explains variations about the modal career trajectory of low achieving students, drawing on Bourdieu's work. It helps to explain the relationship between social values, family ethos, industry, school and economic performance, and the relatively low class consciousness in Japan. It should be of interest to educationalists, sociologists and labour relations specialists studying Japan.

Learning Strategies for School, Home, and Work

Learning Strategies for School, Home, and Work

Reinforces the importance of solid study skills. Cultivates essential skills for succeeding at school, home, and work. Teachers students how to use their own learning styles to master skills. Focuses on goal setting, organization, locating information, active reading, note taking, test taking, and more. Includes background information, vocabulary, answers, additional activities, and assessment tools.

Working and Growing Up in America

Working and Growing Up in America

The Wesleyan Sunday-school magazine [afterw.] The Wesleyan methodist Sunday school magazine

The Wesleyan Sunday-school magazine [afterw.] The Wesleyan methodist Sunday school magazine

Real Learning, Real Work

Real Learning, Real Work

First Published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

From School to Productive Work

From School to Productive Work

A final chapter discusses current developments and lessons for Britain

Why School Anti-Bullying Programs Don't Work

Why School Anti-Bullying Programs Don't Work

This book serves as a guide for readers interested in improving school climate. Using 15 years of consultation and research in a variety of United States and foreign schools, the authors strip down the elements needed to create a healthy and productive school climate. The book challenges many commonly held notions about violence prevention and outlines a simple and inexpensive formula for creating sustained change in any school. The book stresses understanding of the underlying processes involved in the bully-victim-bystander power dynamics, the value of altruism, and the use of natural leaders to begin and sustain change in a school climate. A note on the book's cover: Positive vibrations is taken from a Bob Marley song: 'Rastaman vibration positive, you can't live that negative way.' The song rallies people to be positive and strong, and to speak honestly and stand up for their rights, while taking care of themselves. Although jamaican in origin, it has universal application to be a gentle warrior in one's personal life for the good of self and others.