Showing "Comics" Total

A Collection of Songs, Comic, Satirical, and Descriptive, Chiefly in the Newcastle Dialect

A Collection of Songs, Comic, Satirical, and Descriptive, Chiefly in the Newcastle Dialect

Comic Con Artist

Comic Con Artist

Frank and Joe Hardy investigate forgeries of original comic book art at a comics convention in San Francisco.

Fame: Katy Perry - comic book edition

Fame: Katy Perry - comic book edition

From Christian singer to pop superstar, she's been through it all, seemingly. She's been on the cover of every magazine and newspaper in circulation, she's been featured in countless news articles, she's been married and divorced, and she's performed in front of millions. She's Katy Perry, and this comic will teach you everything there is to know about the California girl.

How to Draw Comic Book Bad Guys and Gals

How to Draw Comic Book Bad Guys and Gals

The secrets of drawing diabolical, spine-tingling characters pack this entertaining, how-to title designed for artists, and even kids, who aspire to be working cartoonists.

Irony in the Age of Empire

Irony in the Age of Empire

Valuing comedy in social and political ethics

2010 Comic Book Checklist & Price Guide

2010 Comic Book Checklist & Price Guide

Lists prices for more than 75,000 publishers from 1961 to the present.

Will Eisner Reader

Will Eisner Reader

A volume of short graphic tales includes the piece, "A Sunset in Sunshine City" and follows the author's nostalgia-marked transition into a post-retirement life in mid-1980s Florida. Reprint.

Shakespeare's Comic Olympics

Shakespeare's Comic Olympics

Swifter. Higher. Stronger. Funnier! Another four summers have passed and with it come the age-old Games known for its athletic achievements, dedication, perseverance, andurinating into little cups. As the comically-charged competition hurdles forward, teams from Greece, England, France, and Italy showcase their top athletes in such standard events as Love Letter Relay, Infidelity Aquatics, Shooting Love Riddles, Cross Dressage, and the crowd favourite Clown Decathlon, all culminating in the always physically demanding Marital Marathon. Add to the mix such demonstration sports as Bear Baiting and Rodeo Shrew Taming and the Slapstick Shenanigans erupt with more hilarity than you can shake a Shtick at! Upstart Crow Sports Network (UCSN) proudly brings you Shakespeares Comic Olympics, a clever hybrid of improvised sporting play and spectacle theatre transforming Shakespeares Comedies and Romances into Olympic events. Ben Jonson and Jack Falstaff provide all the play-by-play colour commentary with interviews and updates from that on-the-track historian/reporter Raphael Holinshed, as Olympic athletes overcome incredible obstacles and comic feats of timing in their quest for that coveted Ring Finger Gold!

The Immortal Comedy

The Immortal Comedy

Immortal Comedy is the first book to 'think' philosophically about the comic phenomenon in general. Although author Agnes Heller had written a book that is both deeply scholarly and meditative on the subject of the comic form in film, literature, and life her writing is eminently approachable. In both its subject and style, Immortal Comedy is a seminal book. In it, Heller takes us on a journey through theories of comedy beginning with classical thought. She then detours through foundational political thinkers who refer to, for instance, laughter and power. We are also introduced to modern systematic approaches to thinking comedy, psychological approaches, and existential approaches. The discerning combination of Heller's individual taste for the pantheon of comedic work and, also, what critics may consider 'less significant' work gives this book a character apart from all others. It is the detail with which Heller makes her discussion, how and where she locates 'the comic,' and probably most significantly her discussion of comedy and our own lives that makes Immortal Comedy a principal book for the entire range of humanities scholars and enthusiasts.

Alan Ayckbourn’s "Season’s Greetings" in the Comic Tradition

Alan Ayckbourn’s

Seminar paper from the year 2007 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, printed single-sided, grade: 1, University of Marburg (Institut f r Anglistik und Amerikanistik), course: SE: "British Drama from the 1950s to the Present," 15 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: This term paper deals with the placement of Alan Ayckbourn's Season's Greetings in the English comic tradition. Therefore, I will first put Ayckbourn's play within the historical context of the new drama, and subsequently define the term "comedy." Then, I will prove my thesis that Season's Greetings matches both conventionality and innovation with regard to comedy. In this way, I will also investigate in how far Season's Greetings as comedy contains both farcical and tragic elements, and suits other subgenres of comedy, too. Likewise, I will analyse how Ayckbourn makes use of the comic in Season's Greetings, and discuss if he continues the comic tradition with a new emphasis with regard to the assumption that he, like Shakespeare, writes plays for the spectator rather than the reader, among other things. In the conclusion, I will recap and reconsider the principal theses of my term paper and give my own diagnosis about Ayckbourn's drama. My thesis matters in so far that "the continuing life that [...] comedies have [...] justifies our study of the genre [...]." Besides, English comedy has "the longest, most continuous generic tradition in Western literature," in which its tendency to the meta-theatrical achieves an awareness of the comic tradition onstage (cf. Leggatt 2). Anyway, it is meaningful that serious issues of everyday life are treated in a comic way.

How Comics Reflect Society

How Comics Reflect Society

American superhero-comics have been around for over 70 years now. In that period not only the genre and its medium matured but also the social, cultural and political environment changed. This paper hypothesizes that superhero comics change over time to stay relevant and that the observant reader can make conclusions about the time during which a comic was written by analyzing it. The first part of this paper gives a short summary of the history of superhero comics from the creation of Superman in 1939 to the Modern Age of Comics. It explains how the superhero comic originated in the late 1930s, blossomed in the 1940s, struggled in the 1950s and reinvented itself in the 1960s. Events like the introduction of the Comic Book Code and the death of Gwen Stacy will be presented and it will be explained why they had an immense impact on the comic-book culture. Also, the definition of the term superhero will be discussed. Afterwards, the essay focuses on the different kinds of comic-book revisionism and the different reasons for it. This and the chapters before help to understand how the comic book industry works and how innovations in comic books are introduced and why they happen. The main part of the essay continues to prove the hypothesis on the example of three superheroes that have all existed since the Golden Age of Comics: Wonder Woman, Captain America and Batman. Each of those superheroes will provide an example for a different kind of social change: With the help of Wonder Woman, the change of the women's role and the change of feminism will be examined. Captain America is a great example of a superhero created out of a social and political need and of the struggle that arises when this need is fulfilled. He also poses as an example for how comics comment on political changes. Finally, the Batman comics are used to illustrate the power Dr. Frederic Wertham's book Seduction of the Innocent had over society and over comics itself. That chapter also discusses what the changes, made to Batman comics in reaction to the accusation of homosexuality, say about the reputation of homosexuals in the 1950s. The last part of this essay gives an example for the possibilities to use this topic in school, in English as a foreign language or history classes.

The Comic Worlds of Peter Arno, William Steig, Charles Addams, and Saul Steinberg

The Comic Worlds of Peter Arno, William Steig, Charles Addams, and Saul Steinberg

For many readers of the New Yorker magazine, the drawings of Peter Arno, William Steig, Charles Addams, and Saul Steinberg epitomize its sophisticated wit and disarming humor. In The Comic Worlds of Peter Arno, William Steig, Charles Addams, and Saul Steinberg, Iain Topliss considers the work of each artist, traces its development, and recalls the cultural and social context in which it was created.